5 Ways to Maintain Positive Communication with Teachers

Let’s take a moment to pat ourselves on the back for making it through the first month of school we did it! As a parent of a child with autism, it’s especially important to maintain positive and continued communication with teachers. There are so many day-to-day happenings that are important for both parents and teachers to know about. Here are some helpful ways to maintain a strong relationship with your child’s teacher.

    1. Ask for their preferred method of contact. This is important. The last thing anyone wants to happen is to find out you’ve been writing emails to someone who never checks their inbox —  yikes! Asking them for the best way to reach them from the beginning can clear up any confusion early on.
    2. Try to communicate outside of Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings. IEP meetings are a great way for teachers, parents and therapists (if your child has one who comes to school) to sit down and review the child’s progress and where they need improvement. However, sometimes things can’t wait to be shared at the next IEP meeting. Setting up meeting times in-between IEP meetings can help parents, teachers and the child tremendously.
    3. Be respectful. As a parent of a child with autism, your child’s needs are evident. A teacher can have many other students in the same classroom with varying needs. We need to respect that our child is not the only one in the equation. Trust that the teacher is doing the best they can to not only meet your child’s needs, but those of their peers.
    4. Give them your tips. A child can have many teachers and faculty come in and out of their life. Communicating your tips and tricks to your child’s specific needs can be a tremendous help. Also, it may give you some relief that the teacher is going to use the same techniques that you do at home. Consistency in the life of your child with autism can be beneficial to them.
    5. Remember: This is a team effort. Everyone involved wants to see your kiddo succeed. Knowing what they do at home can help the teacher throughout the school day — and knowing what they did at school can help you at home. With effort being shown and communicated on both sides, you can expect to see some positive results this school year.

 

 

We are all busy. Sometimes, maintaining communication with a teacher can’t fit into your schedule. We totally get it. But occasionally using and sticking to a few of these methods can make a difference in the school year. We already conquered one month, so here’s to a happy and healthy nine more! #autismawarenesseveryday

Supporting the Hang Tough Foundation

On September 7th, we were fortunate enough to support one of our valued community partners: The Hang Tough Foundation! The foundation’s mission is to take care families who have a child affected by a chronic or life altering illness or special needs. This mission is very important and special to us as we do the same for our clients and families who are affected by autism. The Hang Tough Foundation held their third annual Cascades Goes Gold event last week to aid in fulfilling their mission!

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the kiddos, face painting, giant Connect-Four, and gold Tallahassee Rocks painting were some of the fun activities provided at this wonderful event. Cayer Behavioral Group had a special visit from our friend Elsa, too! We loved playing with some Hang Tough heroes and their families as well as some of our clients and families who came to support such an amazing community. Commissioner Richardson issued a special proclamation to some of the Hang Tough Heroes from the City of Tallahassee! The proclamation officially declared September as Pediatric Cancer Awareness Month for the City of Tallahassee. Cascades was truly painted gold as the fountains and amphitheater glowed with a golden tint. The evening ended with a half-mile walk led by Heroes and their families to honor those who have faced and are facing childhood cancer.

Our partnership with the Hang Tough Foundation is one filled with joy. Throughout the month of September we will host a golden tricycle to honor the foundation and those affected by pediatric cancer, chronic illness, and special needs. As a business working and advocating for children and families affected by autism, we hope that events similar to the beautiful one hosted by the Hang Tough Foundation can shed a light on challenges and victories our children face daily. Please visit The Hang Tough Foundation’s website for more information and upcoming events! #autismawarenesseveryday #HTFGoesGold

Helping Siblings Feel Valued

Let’s talk about a full house! Unfortunately, we are not in San Francisco and Danny Tanner won’t be doing our spring cleaning. But, many of us do understand what it’s like to have a house full of excitement, and sometimes a bit of crazy. Adding a child with autism to the mix can bring just as many questions as there are good times. Each sibling is equally important, but sometimes the immediate needs of your child with autism seem to be a priority.  So, how do you make sure all the kids feel equally valued? Have no fear, CBG is here! We have some helpful pointers to make your family as happy as possible!

  1. Keep each child informed. Everyone in the family has the right to understand what your child with autism goes through. Do it early and do it often! Siblings may need help understanding that their brother or sister doesn’t process social interaction or sarcasm well. Therefore, if there is a situation where they want to play or tell a joke, and their sibling with autism doesn’t react how they hoped, they understand.
  2. Have open and honest conversation. Ask them how they feel; answer any and all questions; let them know they are heard. If they don’t want to talk at that moment, just let them know that you’re there for them. It will make a world of difference.
  3. Determine designated alone time for each child. Your child with autism needs special time with their parents, and so do their siblings. For example, have each child help with dinner one night a week or take them to the bookstore after school. Doing little things with one child at a time can help make them feel valued and important.
  4. Not everything has to be done as a family. Some events that involve high levels of sensory stimulation, crowds, and unknown variables may not be appropriate for your child with autism. That is completely okay! There are places that may be great for your child with autism that their brothers and sisters may not enjoy. Finding fun things to do as a family is important, but remember, it’s okay if that is not always the case!
  5. Find support for siblings. Those who will most understand what the siblings of your child with autism are going through are kids and adults who are experiencing the same thing. There are tons of resources available! Here are some that you may consider checking out:

Little bumps in the road may happen, and that is okay! The goal is to have everyone in your family feel equally important and valued, especially when autism is in the mix. The days may be long, but the years are short and time is precious! We hope that these tips can help strengthen the bonds in your family and beyond! #autismawarenesseveryday